Categories
Links

How to Practice Mindfulness Throughout Your Work Day – Mindful

You probably know the feeling all too well: You arrive at the office with a clear plan for the day and then, in what feels like just a moment, you find yourself on your way back home. Nine or 10 hours have passed but you’ve accomplished only a few of your priorities. And, most likely, you can’t even remember exactly what you did all day. If this sounds familiar, don’t worry. You’re not alone. Research shows that people spend almost 47% of their waking hours thinking about something other than what they’re doing. In other words, many of us operate on autopilot.

Add to this that we have entered what many people are calling the “attention economy.” In the attention economy, the ability to maintain focus and concentration is every bit as important as technical or management skills. And because leaders need to absorb and synthesize a growing flood of information in order to make good decisions, they’re hit particularly hard by this emerging trend.

The good news is you can train your brain to focus better by incorporating mindfulness exercises throughout your day. Based on our experience with thousands of leaders in over 250 organizations, here are some guidelines for becoming a more focused and mindful leader.

 

 

Categories
Links

How to Beat Creative Blocks – Mindful

It’s Monday afternoon and maybe that second cup of coffee isn’t getting your brain geared quite the way you expected it to (although maybe another three will be okay, according to a Harvard neuroscientist.)

When you’ve hit a wall at work, this video from New York Magazine’s Science of Us suggests it’s time to go into tinker-mode. Research on creative problem solving shows people don’t spend enough time in this phase. The solution? Keep at it. People come up with better solutions the longer they spend working on them.

Tinkering is key—the brain has “leaky filters,” as science columnist Sharon Begley writes. When we give ourselves the time, disparate items can sift together to form new combinations: the essence of creativity.

When you’ve hit a wall at work, this video from New York Magazine’s Science of Us suggests it’s time to go into tinker-mode. Research on creative problem solving shows people don’t spend enough time in this phase. The solution? Keep at it. People come up with better solutions the longer they spend working on them.

 

 

Categories
Links

15 Mantras that Will Give You Strength (When You Need it Most)

 

It has been said that the highest form of prayer is giving thanks.  Instead of praying for different circumstances, give thanks for what you have.  (You’ll see why.)

“I finally learned a big lesson.  I now know I can be beaten and broken.  I’m not as tough and crafty as I thought.  I see clearly now what was blind to me just yesterday morning.  At this point, it’s the only good thing that came out of all of this.  But in a way, it’s all I need.  I know myself better today than I did yesterday, and know what I have to do.”

 

 

Categories
Links

Climate Change: A Faceless Villain – Mindful

If only global warming were caused by ISIS declaring a “weather war” on the west, perhaps by gleefully releasing 18 tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere every day and gloating when droughts, deluges, heat waves, killer storms, wildfires, or floods ensued. That might incite more people to get upset about it.

 

In fact, global warming is increasing the frequency and severity of all those events, as well as raising sea levels. But it comes from something quite different from an evil-looking terrorist. The sources—such as power plants, vehicles, farms, and factories—are impersonal and invisible, and close to home—the way we use energy, not the machinations of a foreigner. Faced with a threat with these attributes, the brain reacts with an unimpressed meh: Our minds evolved to detect and respond to threats that have certain features, and global warming has none of them.

 

In terms of getting people to care about global warming enough to demand a government response or to take personal action, “you couldn’t design a problem that’s a worse fit for our psychology,” Andrew Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communications, told me.

 

Countless polls have documented the lack of concern about global warming and the resulting climate change, which threatens to exact an enormous financial and human toll. The Yale Project’s 2015 survey, for instance, found that about 16% of US adults are die-hard climate deniers, rejecting the scientific research that has documented how the rise in greenhouse gases from human activities (primarily burning coal, oil, and natural gas) is trapping heat in the planet’s atmosphere and altering Earth’s climate. While another 63% believe (correctly) that global warming is happening, only 48% believe (also correctly) that it is due to human activities. Just 41% know that the vast majority of climatologists have reached that conclusion. This has been widely and repeatedly reported in the media, so when people say they do not “believe” these facts, or don’t care about them, it suggests something in their psychology is at fault.

 

Categories
Links

A Comprehensive look at Keyword Research

I am a fan of keyword research and this article will help you offer up better, more meaningful content to your subscribers.

Things like

Go where your learners are

or finding out what questions they have

Categories
Links

Social Article Marketing from Luis Galarza


Categories
Links

Net Neutrality from Democracy Now

Time to study Net neutrality

Categories
Links

Honeycomb Kids

Including more than 300 practical ideas and activities, Honeycomb Kids is a book with two priceless benefits: not only does it help you prepare your children for an uncertain tomorrow, it also helps you shift to a better family life for today.

is a book with two priceless benefits: not only does it help you prepare your children for an uncertain tomorrow, it also helps you shift to a better family life for today.

 

Curated from www.resilience.org

Add your annotation